99 Fun and Frugal Summer Activities for Kids!

summer activities for kids

Summer Activities for Kids

Summertime! It’s the most wonderful time of the year! So many fun hours with the kiddos await! In this article I am going to share 97 ideas for summer activities for kids!

 

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99 Free and Cheap Summer Activities for Kids

I don’t know about you, but I look forward to the summer like flowers look forward to the sunshine! And I love this time of year especially because there are so many fun free and cheap things you can do with your family during the summer to stay entertained. Here I mention 97 fun, free, and cheap summer activities for kids!

 

 

 

Summer Activities for Kids That You Can Do at Home

  1. Run through the sprinklers.
  2. Play in a backyard (plastic, inflatable, built-in) swimming pool.
  3. Eat popsicles, ice pops, or ice cream bars or sandwiches.
  4. Make popsicles.
  5. Create your own slip’n’slide with a long sheet of plastic (such as painter’s plastic) and a garden hose.
  6. Have your children invite a handful of friends over for a water activities day. Blow up the pool, turn on the sprinklers, get out the water table, play water balloon games, and more.
  7. Have a water balloon toss with your kids.
  8. Play dolls or superheroes.
  9. Play pirates or ships outside.
  10. Build a race track and have a race.
  11. Make chocolate milk or hot cocoa and make and decorate homemade donuts.
  12. Make and decorate cookies.
  13. Make banana splits or hot fudge sundaes.
  14. Make caramel popcorn.
  15. Read together.
  16. Write and act out a simple play.
  17. Color or marker together.
  18. Play house (or family, as my five-year-old daughter likes to call it) or school or bakery (or ice cream shop—you get the idea J).
  19. Go on a scavenger hunt.
  20. Draw a map and go on a treasure hunt.
  21. Paint together.
  22. Do finger painting.
  23. Have your children invite a handful of friends over to play simple games like “Duck, Duck, Goose,” “Musical Chairs,” “Hot Potato,” “London Bridges,” “Follow the Leader,” and so on.
  24. Have a tea party.
  25. Play dress-up.
  26. Form a band (create or gather together simple musical instruments to play together as a family or with friends).
  27. Dance together.
  28. Do aerobics or other exercises together.
  29. Do simple (sometimes edible) crafts together.
  30. Give the kids a bubble bath.
  31. Play age-appropriate board games and card games together.
  32. Play with wooden blocks.
  33. Play with marble tube games.
  34. Play with plastic building blocks.
  35. Do puzzles together.
  36. Do chalk art.
  37. Blow bubbles.
  38. Build a fort out of chairs or sectional furniture and large sheets or blankets.
  39. Let the kids help to make a simple meal.
  40. Play on your swing set.
  41. Jump on the trampoline.
  42. Color with chalk on the sidewalk.
  43. Play tag in the backyard.
  44. Let your kids help you garden.
  45. Play catch.
  46. Play Frisbees.
  47. Play kickball or football.
  48. Play soccer.
  49. Go camping as a family in the backyard.
  50. Have a hot dog or marshmallow roast in the backyard.
  51. Make indoor or outdoor s’mores.
  52. Play freeze tag.
  53. Go “camping” in your family room for the night.
  54. Watch a movie together (let your kids pick it).
  55. For older kids, have them help you build a clubhouse, playhouse, or treehouse.
  56. Ask your children what they want to do, and then do it!

Summer Activities for Kids That You Can Do on the Go

  1. Go for a bike ride, or ride scooters.
  2. Ride skateboards or inline skates.
  3. Go for a drive up the canyon.
  4. Go on a picnic.
  5. Go to a parade.
  6. Go to an outdoor pageant.
  7. Have a barbecue at the park.
  8. Roast hotdogs and marshmallows up the canyon.
  9. Roast marshmallows and make s’mores up the canyon.
  10. Go fishing.
  11. Go to the beach.
  12. Build sand castles.
  13. Create a sand village.
  14. Build sand tunnels and bridges.
  15. Skip rocks in the pond.
  16. Catch frogs or tadpoles (my kids love doing this!).
  17. Go tubing down the river.
  18. Go to (or host) a family get-together or reunion.
  19. Go kayaking or canoeing (if you can rent for cheap or borrow the equipment).
  20. Go to an outdoor movie (many communities have weekly movies in the park during the summer months).
  21. Go see fireworks.
  22. Go to a botanical garden.
  23. Visit an inexpensive bird aviary or a butterfly refuge.
  24. Have the kids take swimming lessons at the community pool (consider getting a season or annual pass).
  25. Visit cousins or set up a play date with friends.
  26. Visit Grandma and Grandpa or aunts and uncles.
  27. Go to a free or inexpensive music concert.
  28. Visit a state or national park.
  29. Go camping—even if it’s just in your backyard some of the time.
  30. Go to an indoor (or outdoor, if it’s warm enough) pool.
  31. Go out for (inexpensive) ice cream.
  32. Go to a kid-friendly restaurant with a play area and buy ice cream or inexpensive food the kids can eat for a snack, and then let them play for an hour (or three).
  33. Go to an inexpensive movie (dollar theater).
  34. Go for a walk or hike.
  35. Go to the park.
  36. Fly kites.
  37. Go to a splash pad.
  38. Go to an inexpensive water park (consider getting season passes).
  39. Visit free or inexpensive museums or aquariums (or go on a day when admission is free or reduced).
  40. Go to the zoo (especially when you can get reduced-price or free admission).
  41. Go to activities or to read at the library.
  42. Go to an inexpensive fun center or jumping gym.
  43. Go tubing down a river. 

Conclusion

The possibilities for summer activities for kids really are limitless! Even though it might be hot outside, there are so many things you can do this summer to have fun with your kids and help keep them entertained (without sitting in front of the TV or other electronic device all day or evening long)!

If you did just one of these fun summer activities for kids each day, you would have a different activity to do all summer long and beyond!

 

What summer activities for kids do you love to do? Please let me know in the comments below other fun activities that you do with your children during the summer months! I would love to hear your ideas!

 

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13 Best Tips for How to Save Money while Raising a Family

how to save money while raising a family | raise kids without going broke

 

How to Save Money While Raising a Family

There are many things that you can do as a parent to save money while raising a family!

If you are looking to raise kids without going broke, then read on. I am a firm believer in the principle that it’s not kids that are expensive—it’s parents. Kids are completely happy (unless you train them otherwise by your own behavior) to play with sticks and dirt and rocks for hours. They’ll enjoy the box the toys come in as much (and sometimes even more) than the toys themselves. They’ll have endless fun playing with household items like pots and pans and plates. Most kids are quite content with whatever toys or clothes or art supplies or whatever they have—unless you teach them not to be. Or unless you allow the TV and commercials to teach them to always want new and better and more stuff.

We don’t watch TV in our house (not because we’re against it but because it’s just not a priority for us and so we never hooked it up when we moved into our current house—though we do watch videos on YouTube sometimes and shows we get from the library), and I’m sure that that minimizes our kids’ potential discontent and feelings of not having enough because they are not exposed to constant commercials. You might want to consider pulling the plug on TV, as well, and just get shows and movies from the library, like we do. You’ll potentially save money and the kids won’t be able to sit in front of the TV mindlessly for hours on end. You can also have the peace of mind that what they are watching you are aware of and have approved.

Millions of kids throughout history never touched electronics, and I think in general they may have been happier than our kids are overall today—and better off. Sometimes more stuff just causes more problems. So don’t feel that you always have to buy your children new and better stuff or that they have to have the best of everything. If you’ll give them your time and your attention, your love and also your affection, your patience and your kindness, your guidance and your firmness (when needed), along with an awesome (but not perfect) example of who they can become, they will be rich in all the ways that really matter.

 

You Can Find Tons of Great Ways to Save Money While Raising a Family!

You don’t have to go broke or break the bank to raise healthy, happy, well-rounded kids. There are lots of ways you can save money as you raise them in order to use that money for things that will ultimately bless their lives much more than another shiny toy—things like helping to pay for their college education, saving for your own retirement so that you won’t be a burden on them later in life, and saving for emergencies and for larger purchases so that they won’t feel the effects of undue financial stress. And you can bless their lives by teaching them sound financial principles by example so that they can be financially successful adults.

Read on to find some of the best tips for how to save money while raising a family!

 

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13 Best Tips for How to Save Money while Raising a Family

Here are 13 strategies that will help you spend less so that you can save money while raising a family!

 

1. Keep your grocery bill down.

One of the main things that you can do to save money while raising a family is to save money on food. Food is one of the biggest expenses for a family. It can often eat up (pun intended :)) 10 percent or even more of a family’s budget. But food is also one of the areas where it’ the easiest to cut back because there are so many options available and the difference between what you can spend and what you have to spend is so vast. Here are just a few ideas for ways you can save money when feeding your brood (but see this article for many more ideas on how to trim your grocery bill):

Make your own baby food. When you think about it, baby food is really not a good way to spend your food dollars. And that’s why we probably bought only 10 jars maybe of baby food in the time we were raising our three little ones. Because baby food is so easy to make yourself, and so much cheaper when you do it yourself!

Because I breastfed our three children we didn’t introduce them to solid foods until they were six months old, but even if you introduce your children as early as four months old to big people food, there are many things you can easily prepare that you don’t have to even blend up, like giving them wedges (not bite-sized pieces—that’s what causes a choking hazard) of banana, (soft) tomatoes, avocado, cheese, strawberries, peaches, soft pears, apricots, cantaloupe, mangoes, watermelon, cooked carrots, hard-boiled eggs, and more.

And you can feed them lots of other food you already eat, like applesauce, guacamole, salsa, yogurt, hummus, refried beans with cheese, oatmeal, and hot wheat cereal (such as Cream of Wheat), just as it is. But for the food you do grind up, such as cooked peas, sweet potatoes, carrots, broccoli, and more, one easy way to keep it is to freeze it in ice cube trays for easy-to-make infant-sized portions. After it’s frozen, just pop the squares out of the tray and store them in zip-top bags until your little one eats them all up.

Forget the juice. Most kinds really don’t have much nutritional value. Give your kids whole fruit and water to drink, instead.

Go easy on junk food. Kids may love kisses and candy, but try to go heavy on the kisses and light on the candy. Try to help your children form good eating habits while they’re young.

Don’t take your kids shopping with you. It’s pretty much inevitable that you’ll buy more than you planned that way. Try to leave them at home with the other parent.

For more than 60 additional ideas for how to save big money on your grocery bill, read this article.

 

2. Find ways to reduce your money spent on clothes and shoes.

Another way to save money while raising kids is to save money on clothing. If you have close friends or family members or fellow church members who have kids around the same age as you, see if you can set up a clothing co-op, where you trade clothes around. I’ve done that with three of my sisters (the other one’s children were older that the rest of ours), and it worked so great. Whatever clothes we bought or received as gifts from baby showers or from doting grandparents we would just use until they were outgrown, and then we would add them to the collective pool, where whoever needed clothes next would just take the appropriate size of clothes and use them as needed and then return them and grab the next size up. It meant we have all had to buy a lot fewer clothes than we would have otherwise!

Other ways to save money on clothes include buying them from second-hand kid stores (like Kid to Kid) or thrift stores, or buying them from online classifieds. This works especially well when you need a whole season’s worth of clothes that someone else’s kids have outgrown, and you can buy them in bulk and save a ton of money.

Read this article for more ways to save on clothing.

 

3. Buy inexpensive furniture.

When you have young children, it may not make sense to have fancy or expensive furniture. There is a high probability that your furniture will get thrashed or at least worn out while your children are young. (In fact, when we just replaced our 15-year-plus-old furniture with newer used furniture, my five-year-old said she wished we still had the old furniture—I think because my husband doesn’t let the kids eat on the furniture much anymore.) You can save a bunch of money buying used—the three gently used pieces we got were $25 each from a second-hand store (they were having a half-off sale).

 

4. Keep your spending on toys and gadgets in check.

Another thing you can do to raise your kids without going broke and save money while raising your family is to save money on toys and gadgets. It’s fine to buy your children some of the toys and electronics you think or know that they want—as long as you can afford it. But afford is a funny word. Sometimes people think if they can buy it without going into debt (even if they’re not saving any money at all for emergencies or larger expenses or retirement) or if they can pay their minimum balances on their credit cards, then they can afford it. Don’t fall into that trap—or if you’ve been in it before, don’t fall for it anymore. Reasonable toys and electronics and so on are fine, but don’t let your spending on those things (for your children or for yourself) put what should be more important financial priorities in jeopardy.

 

 

5. Find ways to entertain your children for cheap or for free.

And you can definitely find inexpensive ways to entertain your children that will help you to save money while raising your kids. There are a ton of fun things that you can do with your kids for cheap or for free, from walking to hiking to biking to playing at the park to going to the library to baking and cookie making and more. See this huge list of ideas for fun free and cheap activities to do with your children.

And also check out this article with more ideas on how to save money on entertainment.

 

6. Keep the birthday parties and gift giving reasonable.

I don’t know if the situation with birthday parties and gift giving is the same everywhere in the U.S., but I would guess that it is. Not only has the party throwing for and gift giving to the little birthday guy or gal gotten over the top, but so have the party favors and expectations for the guests.

It’s almost like we feel that we have to give those who come to the party a gift for giving a gift. And though that’s a nice sentiment in theory, somewhere the trend of spending and spending has to stop.

In our (extended) family, gift giving by the aunts and uncles or cousins to the birthday boy or girl is optional, not required, and when our kids are a little older and start to have parties with more than just a couple of close friends, I think I am going to ask that the kids bring no gifts at all.

That’s not because a heartfelt gift isn’t appreciated. Or that my kids wouldn’t love to have another fun toy to play with. But they already have enough. They already have bins of toys—they don’t need any more. Having kids come to play and have fun spending time together with the birthday person should be the true gift—that should be enough. So though we’re only one family in the sea of humanity, maybe we can start a tiny little ripple against the consumerism that seems to have completely taken over our country.

For more information on this topic, read this article on gift giving.

 

7. Save money on entertainment and vacations.

You can also find ways to save money while raising your family and avoid going broke by saving on your entertainment and vacation expenses. Family entertainment that provides opportunities for time spent together and also family vacations where children and parents can strengthen relationships are important. And fortunately, they can be done fairly inexpensively. Check out this list of many free and cheap activities you can do with your kids.

And some of my favorite memories of growing up in my own family are our family vacations—even when things didn’t always go exactly as planned. Or maybe especially when they didn’t. 🙂 But you can save money on vacations, too! One of our favorite ways these days to save on vacations is to use Airbnb to book our accommodations. It’s more personal and even more enjoyable than staying in a hotel or even a vacation condo, and it’s less expensive! Triple win! For our last vacation, we stayed in a couple of great places with awesome pools and hot tubs and playgrounds, and we paid about $40 per night. And the places were definitely better than the pretty ghetto (most unfortunately!) hotel rooms in the same price range. Sign up for an Airbnb account here to start saving on your vacations and to receive $40 to go toward your first stay. Pretty awesome!

Learn more about how to save money on entertainment.

 

8. Make good dental hygiene a priority.

Another way to save money while raising your family is to make sure that you brush your children’s teeth twice a day and floss at least once a day. Otherwise, you could be spending big bucks for dental work down the road.

Our son hasn’t had any cavities so far, but our girls have had 10 cavities between them—and our younger daughter just started to go to the dentist this year! And we may have to have an anesthesiologist put her under in order to fix the rest of her cavities (for $400; at the first dentist’s office we went to, they wanted $500!), since the last time the dentist tried to work on her teeth, she got nervous and things didn’t go so well. And the anesthesiologists in the area apparently aren’t covered by insurance (at least with the two pediatric dentists we’ve visited so far—if we have to actually go the route of anesthesia, I’ll definitely do more calling around to see if one is covered at one of the dentists around).

All of that to say, avoid the problem of cavities if you can! We brush and floss our kids teeth every day, but when they were younger toddlers I think there were nights where we wouldn’t brush their teeth again if they wanted something else to eat later (because they didn’t eat enough dinner) or if they had fallen asleep before we had a chance to do so. We’re working to be more diligent now because, man, paying several hundred dollars out of pocket on top of dental and health insurance isn’t cool!

*Update: My daughter was able to get her dental work done without anesthesia at her last dentist appointment—but that was one down, and we’ve still got one more to go. Fingers crossed that all will go well!

 

9. Don’t automatically supersize your vehicle (and if you do buy a larger vehicle, buy it used for cash).

Another big step you can take as a parent to raise your kids without going broke is to save money on vehicles and related expenses. I know of a family who, as soon as they had their first little one, went out and bought a minivan. Now I guess if you needed a different vehicle anyway and knew that you wanted to have a few children then this wouldn’t necessarily be a bad idea (and I don’t know if that’s what they were thinking), but if you don’t need another vehicle, stick with your car and keep on driving it! A minivan will generally cost more for gas and insurance, let alone the fact that the price of the actual vehicle itself would often be more.

When you do buy a minivan or other larger car to accommodate a growing (or grown) family, plan to buy it with cash. (Learn here how to never have a car payment again!). And if that means that you swap your car for a van worth the same amount or just a little more, that’s OK—it’s better than getting yourself into a ton of debt to buy a depreciating asset (that may depreciate even more if your sweet little angels are rough on it).

Read this article to learn more ways to save on transportation.

 

10. Let your children pay for their own gas and car insurance—and don’t buy a car for them.

When they get to the point where they are old enough to drive, allow them the opportunity to pay for their own gas and auto insurance. I got in a (literal) scrape or two as a young driver, and I might have been more careful with my driving (and almost certainly would have appreciated the privilege of driving more) if my parents had required me to pay my portion of the insurance premium, which may very well have gone up during my teen years because of said scrapes.

And don’t buy them a car. If you don’t have one that they can use on occasion, buy an inexpensive third family car that everyone can share as needed. And if they have a job where they actually work a lot of hours and “need” a car of their own because of that, give them the opportunity to pay for it. They’ll take care of it so much better when they do.

 

11. Stay in a smaller home.

Here, again, don’t go rushing to buy a bigger house when your kiddos come along. Most families lived in small homes for literally millennia—until the very recent past. Let the kids share a room, and stay put in your 1,500-square-foot starter home to literally potentially save hundreds of thousands of dollars. That’s what we’ve decided to do (our house is even smaller than 1,500 square feet), until we can purchase our next home with cash.

So unless you’re in a two-bedroom home (which I would not advise buying if you plan to have children, by the way) and your kids are getting old enough where they really shouldn’t be sharing a room if they’re opposite genders (by about age eight), stay put! And invest all of that money you will save either for retirement or to go toward the purchase of you next larger home when you are in a much better position to really afford it (and maybe till you can do the 100 percent down plan, like we’re planning to do!). Yes, it’s possible that your home may feel cramped at times, especially during the winter months when everyone is cooped up inside, but keep your eyes on your bigger financial goals, and you’ll get through it. We have.

 

12. Have a single shared cell phone for the kids (and a cheap one at that).

Maybe it shouldn’t, but it still surprises me when I see tweens or young teens with smartphones. I know that smartphones don’t have to be that expensive (we have an inexpensive plan from Republic Wireless or you can also check out Mint Mobile or Xfinity Mobile), but kids and teens and tweens don’t need smartphones.

Put that money toward their college educations instead, and consider buying them a cheap, basic (not smart) phone that your kids can share when they have a true need to use a cell phone (which is very rare because of the fact that their friends and teachers will all have cell phones, so they can use those during school activities and things). The potential to get into trouble is a lot less on a dumb phone than on a smartphone, for example. (Yes, I know there are filters and things that can help prevent that—but you won’t have to even worry about that if you don’t give them a smartphone in the first place.)

Now if they get a job as an older teen then that might be a good reason to let them have a cell phone (I still wouldn’t give them a smartphone, for reasons, like I mentioned above, beyond just the financial ones), but then they can pay for it themselves. Yay!

*Update: We just switched over to Xfinity Mobile because, since we don’t use much data at all, it’s even cheaper than Republic and Mint Mobile! We pay just $3.51 per month per line for our smartphone plan! Awesome! We’ve been with Xfinity just a couple of months now for our internet and cell phone service, and so far things have been great! Currently we pay a 12-month introductory rate of just $40 per month for internet (the same price we were paying before but for internet that is literally 30x faster than our older internet), and then it will go up to $65 per month—but you can bet I’ll try to lower our bill when that time comes. 🙂 If you’re interested in signing up for Xfinity Mobile, use the referral code 1RQ4SP to save $25 to $100 when you sign up.

Find out how to save money on your cell phone service.

13. Start saving for college early, and give your kids the opportunity to help pay for it.

Even though a college education can be expensive, it doesn’t have to be. One more thing you can do to save money while raising your family is to save on their college education. Because of the awesome power of compound interest, if you are planning or even hoping to help pay for your kids’ college (let’s turn that hope into reality—you can find ideas here for how to help pay for your children’s college educations), you should start saving as soon as possible. We started saving for our kiddos’ college within a month or two after they were born.

And if you do plan to help them out with college, set up the expectation that your children are going to work and pay for at least some of their college expenses themselves. Again, as with a car, they will appreciate it so much more if they have to help pay for it, and they will take their education more seriously that way and likely get better grades. There was a study done that found that students who worked while in college actually got better grades than those who didn’t—likely because they had to learn to be responsible and manage their time well and do all of the other things that first getting and then keeping down a job require.

Read these articles for more information on how to save for kids’ college and how to pay for kids’ college.

 

Conclusion

It costs money to raise kids, but there are definitely many, many ways that you can save money while raising your family. You can definitely raise your kids without going broke.

It doesn’t have to cost as much as many people think—as the studies demonstrate that show a direct correlation between how much you earn and how much it costs to raise a child. Other than food, clothing, shelter, transportation (all of which you’re already paying for to some degree), and love, there’s really not that much that they need. Again, it’s parents that really make raising kids expensive—not the kids themselves.

So keep that in mind next time you’re in Target and feel tempted to buy your kids just one more thing. 🙂 Put the item back, slowly walk away, and invest the saved money in their ESA (education savings account) instead. When their college expenses are all paid for 10 or 15 or 20 years from now and you don’t have to spend any money on it month to month, you’ll be very glad you did!

 

 

What are your best tips for how to save money while raising your family? Leave a comment below and let me know!

 

Invitation to Share

Was there something in this article that inspired you to change something about your money? Are there ideas or tips that you feel could help others? Would you please take a minute to share this article via email or social media? I would love your help to share these principles of financial well-being. Thank you!

Join Our Facebook Group!

Join our new, closed Families for Financial Freedom Facebook group to get support and share ideas for how we can all improve our financial well-being by earning more, spending less, saving more, and investing more and reach our financial goals. You can do this! And we are here to help.

Review of How Big Is Your Brave? by Ruth Soukup

A Review of “How Big Is Your Brave?” by Ruth Soukup

The new children’s book by Ruth Soukup, How Big Is Your Brave?, is a sweet story about a bunny, Zippy, and her determination to follow her dreams and to not give up when faced with challenges.

If you have children, How Big Is Your Brave? is a great way to help teach them about having big dreams and not giving up when things don’t go as planned.

It is also a sweet story about the love of a brother and sister and how siblings can help and encourage us to follow our dreams.

My children also love the bright colors and beautiful illustrations in the book!

One of my favorite lines from the book is a line that Zippy’s mom says to her: “Being brave doesn’t mean you’re never scared. Sometimes, courage means taking an action, even when you feel afraid.”

If you want a fun way to teach your children about facing their fears, going after their dreams, and not giving up when things get hard, then this may be the perfect book for you!

You can learn more about How Big Is Your Brave? and also order your own copy here.

 

More Information about How Big Is Your Brave? by Ruth Soukup

This is a description of the book:

New York Times bestselling author Ruth Soukup’s mission is to empower children everywhere to dream big and live a life they LOVE. How Big Is Your Brave? encourages readers to face their fears and overcome obstacles in order to follow their dreams and reach their goals.

“In this inspiring story, a young bunny named Zippy dreams of traveling to outer space. When the opportunity to attend space camp arrives, she worries she might not be capable enough to compete with the other kids. But Zippy’s desire to build her own rocket is bigger than her fear of failing, and through hard work and creativity she ends up making her big dreams come true.

“Ruth Soukup is the founder of Living Well Spending Less and Elite Blog Academy. Her practical advice has been featured in Women’s Day, Family Circle, Time, and on Fox News. How Big Is Your Brave? is a children’s picture book adaptation of her adult book and podcast series Do It Scared. Through whimsical illustrations and encouraging text, children will discover how standing up to fears (both big and small) will make them stronger and unstoppable.”

You can learn more about How Big Is Your Brave? and also order your own copy here.

How to Stop Fighting with Your Spouse about Money

how to stop fighting about money

How to Stop Fighting about Money

In this article I am going to discuss 9 simple steps on how to stop fighting about money. Learn important skills that will help you to stop fighting about money with your spouse.

 

Tip: Save the image above to Pinterest so that you can easily refer to this article on how to stop fighting about money later! 

Why Do Couples Fight about Money?

Money is complicated. People can be complicated. Relationships can be really complicated.

When you put those three complex things together, it is perhaps not suprising that many couples fight about money.

Why do couples fight about money? Personally, I believe that it is largely because of these two big factors: First, money touches nearly every aspect of our lives. There is not much that you can do in our modern society that does not require spending or expending money in one way or another.

And second, and probably more important, is that how you spend (and don’t spend) your money really is a reflection of your values. What you spend your money on directly reflects what is important to you.

So if you are spending all of your money on things that really aren’t important to you, then you might want to sit down with your spouse and decide how to better spend and better manage your money. Find help with creating a spending plan (aka, a budget :)) to help you allocate your money to the things that are truly important to you in this article on how to make a budget. You can also find even more information in this beginner’s guide to budgeting.

What Percent of Couples Fight about Money?

If you are currently fighting with your spouse about money, you are probably frustrated. You probably want the situation to change and are unsure exactly what you can do to change it. You might be scared that the marriage that means so much to you might be in danger of falling apart or even coming to an end.

But one thing you are not is alone. According to a recent survey, abuot 50% (48%) of couples fight about money. But, as I discussed briefly above, given the fact that money touches nearly every aspect of our lives and that how we spend our money truly is a reflection of our values, this really is not too surprising. (In fact, given how much money affects most of our lives, maybe we should be grateful that only about 50% of couples fight about money! :))

9 Simple Steps for How to Stop Fighting about Money

Finances touch nearly every aspect of our lives, so money can cause a lot of contention if we’re not careful. Because what we spend our money on reflects to a large extent our core values, money often exposes differences that we may not have even been aware of before marrying.

Money disagreements are the number one cause of divorce in the U.S., but don’t let your marriage become another casualty! You can turn the situation around if you will work together with your spouse to bring about meaningful change. Here are 9 points that can help you stop fighting and begin to heal your marriage.

1. Listen more than you talk.

Sometimes we get so caught up in being right that we forget to work on doing right. Even if you feel that your spouse is the one to blame for your money problems and for the resulting arguments and fights, you can still be the one to start to make simple changes to make things better.

And one of the things you can start to change is to listen more and ask questions more. Not passive-aggressive questions, but true “I want to understand what you’re really thinking and feeling and where you’re coming from” questions. I love the saying that God gave us two ears and one mouth for a reason.

And don’t get me wrong—I know it’s hard. I’m not perfect, and my husband and I argue sometimes too (and even sometimes about money, although—very—fortunately, we are both savers at heart). So I don’t mean to be a hypocrite and have you think that my husband and I never argue. But often people think they understand a problem or an issue, when we really don’t understand the complete picture.

By asking the right questions, and really listening to the answersand by listening to both what’s said and what’s not saidwe can come to better understand each other and better work toward shared solutions.

2. Commit to being a team.

When you are upset about your spouse’s money behavior, remember his or her great qualities. Remember why you got married in the first place. And recommit to fighting together for what’s most important, not fighting against each other. Hold tight to your faith and your family. Work to compromise, to think outside the box, to prioritize, and to sacrifice to find solutions that will work for your family. Selfishness kills marriages, so even if you are the one who feels wronged, find small ways to serve and to give. This doesn’t mean that you’re a martyr or a wimp or a pushover, but from your strength find ways to help and to lift and to love.

And remember that being part of a team is being honest with each other. If there are things that you are avoiding talking about, find appropriate ways and times to bring them up. Let your spouse know you’ve got some things on your mind, put the kids to bed, and then sit down and talk about what’s on your mind—without accusations or blame and if possible without anger. Practice good communication skills by using “I” statements (“I feel frustrated/discouraged/overwhelmed when …”), looking your spouse kindly in the eyes, and reframing your spouse’s statements and answers.

 

3. Discuss your overall philosophies about money.

As you communicate about your finances, revisit your overall views on money. What financial values are important to you? Do you believe it’s important to save up for what you want? Do you believe in lending money to people? What are your feelings on saving for retirement? As you talk about your views on money, it’s helpful to discuss your feelings on these topics:

 

4. Work to be kind and respectful, no matter what.

As you work through your differences when it comes to your views about money or your financial habits, commit to being kind and considerate. I know there may be a lot of resentment built up from past fights and potential misunderstandings. Work very hard to let the past go and focus on the present and the future. As mentioned briefly above, practice new ways to phrase things that don’t point fingers. For example, instead of saying, “I hate it when you …” say instead “I feel anxious (hurt, overwhelmed, frustrated, and so on) when you …” or “It concerns me when we spend more than we have available for …” Work on compromising and coming up with realistic solutions rather than placing blame.

 

5. Focus on your shared goals and dreams.

Start to talk about what you hope to be able to accomplish in your life as you save, spend, and invest wisely. What similar and shared goals and dreams do you have? What do you want your finances to look like in 5, 10, 20, and 40 years? Would you love to be completely out of debt? What can you do to get there? Do you want to own a vacation home on the beach someday? What will it take to get there?

Would you like to help pay for or completely pay for your children’s college educations? How can you make that happen? Are you planning to retire in comfort? How much do you need to save and how long do you plan to work to reach that goal? Do you have a goal to give very generously to the causes you support? What steps can you take now to put you on the path to make that dream a reality?

For an excellent resource to help you reach your money goals and dreams (and solve your money problems), I highly recommend Financial Peace University by Dave Ramsey. It’s an awesome course that my husband and I went through and that I have also taught as an FPU coordinator.

It’s effective in helping you change your money habits because it gives simple, actionable steps you can take to reach your financial goals. Dave is a fun and charismatic teacher! But more important, this course has helped hundreds of thousands of families to get their finances in order, and it has strengthened countless couples as they have been able to work together to improve their financial situations. You can find out more and purchase the course here. 

And if you want help to manage your money and keep up with your finances, you should check out the free app Personal Capital. With Personal Capital, you can see not only all of your bank checking and savings accounts and even your credit cards and other finance accounts, but you can also link your retirement and other brokerage accounts. This allows you to have a complete, overall picture of your current financial situation. And you can also view your account history to see how your accounts and overall portfolio have done over time. I love this very helpful tool and use it all the time! Sign up for your free Personal Capital account here.

 

6. Start with working to overcome simpler obstacles before moving on to tackle bigger ones.

If you have big financial hurdles you need to overcome, such as one spouse being a chronic overspender, it might help to start with smaller, bite-sized goals. For example, you might talk about and commit to cutting expenses in just one area—the easiest one. And then you could talk about reducing expenses in another area.

As you talk about your finances and your spending, create a spending plan to help you get organized with your money. Consider if you might be paying too much in car payments or rent, and what you can do to work together to solve that. You might talk about what you can do to earn more income. If one of you has committed to being a stay-at-home parent, you might look into work-from-home options to help make ends meet.

Read how to get on the same page with your spouse about money.

 

7. Don’t give up.

Realize that bringing about real change might not be easy—it’s probably not going to be easy. Especially if you’ve been having the same types of money fights for months (or even years), it’s going to take some time to reverse that. Be patient with yourself and with your spouse. Take baby steps. Keep moving forward, even when you backslide. Give yourself and your spouse grace. Remember that your (intact) family is the most important thing you have on this earth—and your marriage is the core of that family. So treat it that way. Don’t give up!

 

8. Pray for help, and read God’s Word together.

If you haven’t been praying together as a couple, start. If your spouse isn’t willing to pray, ask if he or she will join you while you do. And do the same for reading the scriptures together. Seek God’s guidance in your life—He wants to give it to you! He wants your family to succeed as much as you do. And He doesn’t want you to be hurting—He doesn’t want fighting and contention in your relationship. So ask Him to help you to heal your marriage and find solutions to your money problems. And then read your scriptures to find answers, and listen for promptings from His Holy Spirit to help you know what to do. He will help you know what to do—I promise!

 

9. Seek marriage counseling.

If your marriage is in severe trouble, seek counseling. Don’t be ashamed—if you had a physical heart problem, you wouldn’t hesitate to seek medical help. And you should feel ust as able to get help with an emotional heart problem. If your spouse won’t go with you, go yourself, and ask for advice on how to talk to your spouse and advice on things you can do to work on the problem from your end. In time, hopefully your spouse will come with you, or you will learn the communication or other skills you need to start resolving issues even if your spouse won’t attend counseling.

 

Conclusion

If you’re in a marriage that is struggling because of financial problems, there is hope. You can do small things every day to help your relationship and your money move in a better direction. See where your spouse is willing to compromise. Consider what you yourself can do better to help improve the situation. Don’t try to solve multiple issues at once. Take things one step at a time, and just do your best. Seek help from loved ones, counselors, and your all-knowing and all-loving Heavenly Father.

 

Do you have specific questions about how to stop fighting about money? What methods have you found that have worked for you and your spouse to talk about money without fighting? Let me know in the comments below! I would love to hear your best ideas and tips!

Invitation to Share

Was there something in this article that inspired you to change something about your money? Are there ideas or tips that you feel could help others? Would you please take a minute to share this article via email or social media? I would love your help to share these principles of financial well-being. Thank you!

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12 Best Tips for How to Teach Your Kids about Money {Help Ensure They Succeed at Money Later in Life!}

how to teach kids about money

How to Teach Kids about Money

In this article I am going to share my best advice for how to teach kids about money. Financial literacy for kids is such an important lesson for them to learn!

 

Tip: Pin the image above so that you can refer later to this article on how to teach kids about money!

 

Why Is It Important to Teach Kids about Money?

Teaching kids about money is one of the most important things we can do as parents to help them to be successful in life. Money touches nearly every aspect of our lives, and learning to manage money well is an essential life skill.

By teaching kids about money you can help them to avoid the pitfalls of living paycheck to paycheck, overspending, amassing a lot of debt, and making poor financial decisions.

And on the positive side, it is important to teach kids about money because this can help them to be in a strong financial position throughout their lives.

When kids understand the fundamentals of personal finance, they can make decisions that will bring them financial peace. They will not be stressed about not being able to pay their bills or make their payments.

They can also make decisions that will help ensure that they build wealth later in life. For example, as they avoid debt, they will have more disposable income. With that disposable income, they can invest for retirement. As they invest for retirement, they are more likely to have long-term financial well-being and success.

By building wealth over time, you can retire with confidence, knowing that you live in comfort later in life. You will have the financial resources to take care of your needs, to travel, to give and to serve others, and more.

When you teach your kids about money, they will be able to follow these best practices outlined above to find financial success and ultimately reach financial freedom.

 

 

Check out these related articles:

 

What Age Shoul You Teach about Money?

Ideally, you will start to teach your kids simple ideas about money from your good example from birth. As soon as they can start to understand what money does, how it is used to make purchases, for example, then they are old enough to learn at least the very basic principles about money.

So, at 2 or 3, you can start to teach kids that when they want a toy, that costs money. You can teach them that when you go to work, that is where money comes from. And you can teach them that as a family you have only a limited amount of money, so you have to make good choices about how to use that limited amount of money. That means you cannot purchase unlimited things; they probably cannot have (and probably should not have :)) all the toys that they want.

As your children get older, you can teach them about the relationship between work and money by assigning them to do chores and rewarding them with an allowance (or commission, as Dave Ramsey calls it).

You can begin to teach them perhaps as early teenagers the importance of avoiding debt and saving for retirement. And teach them the amazing power of compound interest to show them why debt is so debilitating and why saving for retirement early is so important.

 

12 Important Tips for How to Teach Your Kids about Money

Being a parent is awesome—for a lot of reasons. But one of the reasons that being a parent is awesome is that you have these wonderful little sponges. (At least until they become teenagers, or so I’ve heard—but even then I think they listen to and take in a lot more than most parents probably think they do.) And you can influence and teach and raise these wonderful children to be the amazing people you know they can be. And that is your responsibility as a parent!

It is your job to be an influencer while you have the ability to influence—before it (potentially) becomes too late! So here are 12 principles of financial literacy for kids that will help your children to be successful with money.

1. Teach your children the financial values that you want to pass on to them.

If you have strong financial values that have helped you to begin to be successful financially, pass them on to your kids! If you don’t yet, first study and identify your own core financial values, and then teach them to your children. Here are several that we plan to teach to our children (by word and example) as they grow up (click the links below for information on each topic):

 

2. Teach your kids sound money principles by example.

A second important way to promote financial literacy for kids is to teach by example. Even more than talking about your financial values with your children, you need to teach them good financial principles by example. As you teach your children about money, practice what you teach. For instance, don’t talk to them about the dangers of credit card debt, and then cave in and buy a new living room set (on credit that you didn’t budget for to go with the new carpet that you had saved up for.

Kids are smart, and not only will they generally notice the inconsistency between what you teach and what you do, but they’ll often call you on it! Like my kids call me out when I do something wrong—and they’re kindergarten and preschool age!

 

3. Be as transparent as you can about money.

Of course you don’t want to worry your children unnecessarily if you are currently in financial dire straits or anything like that, but don’t be afraid to talk about money often. If things are financially tight, explain the situation to your older children—in a way that won’t freak them out—so that they understand the situation and have realistic expectations.

Tell your children how much you can afford or are willing to contribute to their college ESAs or 529 plans or to their college tuition and other expenses. Let them know if you’re willing to help pay for a car for them, and why or why not. All of these things are excellent insights or lessons for them for later in life.

 

4. Teach your children the value of money.

As you teach principles of financial literacy for your kids, help them to understand the value of money and how much things really cost—appropriate to their age, of course. Show your children your monthly budge when they are old enough to understand it. Take them grocery shopping and clothes shopping with you sometimes so that they get a feel for how much things cost. (My sweet five-year-old thinks we can buy a new-to-us van with the money in the coin cubby in the car. :))

Explain the amazing power of compound interest when they are old enough to understand the concept, and also explain the idea of delayed gratification. Help them to understand why it’s often good to pass on something now in order to get something even better later. Instill in them a to-the-core understanding of what it means to be content with what you have and not always want more.

 

5. Teach your children how to do a simple budget.

Another crucial skill to teach your kids about money is how to budget. Teach your children the importance of a spending plan, and explain to them how to use one. Help them to understand that a budget is simply a document where you decide how you are going to spend your money each month.

When creating your spending plan, make it a zero-based budget. That means that you figure out what you income is going to be for the month, and then before that month begins, you plan how every dollar will be spent so that there is no money left over. You don’t want money left over in your budget because it will fly away like feathers in the wind.

As part of teaching your children to budget, also teach them the importance of comparison shopping (doing price as well as product comparisons) to find not only good deals but good value. For example, they might find a toy at the dollar store for $1, but it might break after a few hours of use. Or they could spend $10 for a new toy at Target that could last a year or more. Or, they could spend $2 at a thrift store or on eBay for the same toy, gently used, that was $10 new at Target, and get the best value of all.

Learn more about creating a budget.

 

6. Teach your children the connection between work and rewards.

I know it is a sometimes hotly debated topic, but consider giving your children the opportunity to do chores to earn money. We haven’t started paying commissions (the term we like to use instead of allowance—taken from Dave Ramsey) yet, but I there’s a good chance that we will once our children are a little older. I definitely like the idea of teaching the correlation between work and monetary compensation, and I don’t want our children to think they’re on the family dole by just getting money for toys and things because they breathe, so it feels like a good approach. But we’ll see how it goes when we get to that bridge.

And same with paying children for earning good grades. My parents did do that some of the time with us, and I think for some of my siblings it probably did encourage them to put in more effort than they otherwise would have. I’m the type that strived for straight A’s regardless, so for me I don’t know that it made much of a difference—but the extra money was nice. 🙂

If you’re on the fence, maybe give it a try and see how it goes. You can always change your mind or adjust your approach later—nothing has to be set in stone. But whether you do or don’t pay commissions, do teach your children the very really connection between hard work and dedicated effort and financial compensation.

If you do pay your children for their work, make sure you teach them how to budget (well, either way, you need to teach them how to budget) so that they will learn how to spend their money wisely and save up for larger purchases and just overall manage their money well (and ideally not be still living in your basement when they’re 30 :)).

 

7. Teach them to be generous givers.

Another important thing to teach your kids about money is the importance of giving—not just money, but time and energy and kindness as well. And teach this to them by example. If you attend a church, let them see you paying tithing and giving offerings. When you donate to your favorite causes, tell them that you are doing it and why you are doing it.

If you choose to give directly to those in need in your community (perhaps by giving items they need rather than money), ask your children to go with you when possible. When they start to earn a little money for themselves through chores, lemonade stands, or their first pet-walking or grass-cutting business, show them how to pay tithing themselves and ask them to give a portion of what they earn to a cause that they care about.

Also find opportunities to serve together in the community as a family—by volunteering at care centers, hospitals, soup kitchens, shelters, and so on.

 

8. Make learning fun as you teach your kids about money.

As you teach principles of financial literacy for your kids, make it fun! There are a lot of things about money that are just fun and interesting all on their own—such as the amazing power of compound interest. But even the subjects that you think might be a little dry, such as learning how to do a budget (unless you’re kind of a nerd like me), can be fun if you get a little creative with it.

For example, let’s say you’re working go get out of debt. In addition to teaching your children why they should avoid debt and the challenges that being in debt brings (having to pay interest, potential loss of your possessions, and so on), you could put a big thermometer on the wall that they can color in as you get closer to reaching your goal.

Or you could use construction-paper loops that they could tear off each time you pay money toward your debts. This will help drive home to them and help teach them how important it is to you to get out of debt. And then when you reach your goal of getting out of debt, you could celebrate by going to dinner or going on a vacation or something like that.

Or let’s say you want to teach your children the importance of saving money. You could work with them to choose an appropriate goal to save toward, such as purchasing a new scooter or bike. And you could agree to match them for whatever they earn from doing chores, for example. So if they earn $30 from doing chores (and maybe even do some extra chores around the house that you agree to pay them for), then you could go to the store and buy a $60 bike.

 

9. Use praise and rewards and give lots of encouragement toward desired behaviors.

As you teach your kids about money, give a lot of praise and sincere encouragement. Children (and adults too!) love honest, sincere praise. I regularly tell my children how amazing they are for just being them—but I also slather on compliments for the things they are able to accomplish. I don’t think this will cause an ego problem at all or hurt them in the least.

There are enough things in the world that try to drag our children down that we need to consistently work to build them up. As long as you teach them the importance of being humble through example and through coaching them and guiding them during teachable moments, you won’t have to worry that that praise will give them a big head when they’re older.

And by giving them praise, they will have the incentive to continue to try and to do their best to succeed and to act in the ways that you would like them to.

10. Help your children set financial goals and work toward them as you teach your kids about money.

Setting and working toward goals is an important factor in success. Those who make written goals are far more likely to achieve them. So as another important way to promote financial literacy for your kids, help your children to develop the habit of setting financial goals when they are fairly young (and definitely by high school).

And when it comes to financial goals, you might help them in setting goals to save for a car, college, a mission or service trip, a high school trip, or other worthwhile expenses. And again, you might match them with your own money to support them in these efforts and help them reach their worthy goals. And remember to encourage them along the way to help them stay motivated and on track!

11. Help your children to get their first job and start saving money for college.

Another important aspect of teaching your kids about money is to guide them in getting their first job. Once I started going to high school, I would work after school at my dad’s office that was within a couple of miles of the high school. Until I could drive, I would walk there every day after school.

I didn’t realize it at the time, but this was an amazing opportunity that I had, because my dad was the owner of the company, to spend additional time with him that most kids don’t get to. And much of the time, I was working on the other side of his very large desk—or later, in an office just down the hall.

I learned a lot of character-defining things from my dad—among them, a strong work ethic, a positive attitude and outlook on life, and a determination to keep trying and not give up. And in addition to that, I was able to earn money to help pay for school, the mission that I later served for my church, my gas and fun money, and more.

Don’t think having a job during high school will hurt your kids and make them miss out on too many opportunities. It won’t. Rather, they will be learning important work and life skills that will benefit them throughout their life. (And as an added benefit, having a job will give your children less time to get into trouble—seriously!)

Teach your children that you expect them to help pay for their college (which I think they should, so that they will appreciate it more)—even if it’s just their housing, food, and vehicle expenses if you’re able and willing to pay for everything else. Go with them to the bank to open a savings account, and decide with them how much of their monthly earnings they should be contributing to that account to help pay for college.

 

12. Teach your kids financial principles often so that they will remember them.

A final important principle of financial literacy for kids is that anything that you really want your children to learn well you are going to have to repeat often. And that is as true for good financial principles as it is for anything else.

Since you will want good money habits to be ingrained in their psyches, be sure to regularly talk with your children about the money values that are important to you and that you want to pass on to them. And if you feel like you have talked about them too much, you might just have talked about them enough.

 

Conclusion

As they say, more is caught than taught. So if you want your children to make good financial decisions and to be successful with their money, then make good financial decisions yourselves so that they will have a model to follow.

But then also consciously teach your kids all that you can about money, such as good financial habits. Don’t leave it to the schools (if they even teach financial literacy) or to chance that your children will just figure out how to be good with their money. Look around you—chances are, they won’t just figure it out.

If you want them to be financially successful in life, you’re going to need to teach your kids how to budget, how to save their money, how to invest, how to work hard, how to spend less than they earn and avoid debt, how to give, and more. It’s a big responsibility—but it’s also an awesome opportunity.

 

What are your best tips for how to teach kids about money? What methods do you use? What have you found works particularly well? I would love to hear your tips and advice! Leave a comment below and share your thoughts so we can all learn together!

 

Invitation to Share

Was there something in this article that inspired you to change something about your money? Are there ideas or tips that you feel could help others? Would you please take a minute to share this article via email or social media? I would love your help to share these principles of financial well-being. Thank you!

Join Our Facebook Group!

Join our new, closed Families for Financial Freedom Facebook group to get support and share ideas for how we can all improve our financial well-being by earning more, spending less, saving more, and investing more and reach our financial goals. You can do this! And we are here to help.

61 Awesome Free and Cheap Winter Activities for Kids

free winter activities for kids

Cheap and Free Winter Activities for Kids

In this article I am going to share 61 fun cheap and free winter activities for kids and families! 

 

Tip: Pin the image above so that you can easily refer to this article on cheap and free winter activities for kids and families later!

 

61 Cheap and Free Winter Activities for Kids and Families

Honestly, even though I enjoy a lot of different winter activities for kids, I kind of dread the colder weather and being largely cooped up inside. During the summer (and the warmer parts of spring and fall) my kids spend much of the day outside in the backyard.

The kids still enjoy doing things outside during the winter, but it sometimes feels like the options are more limited when there is three inches of snow on the ground—or worse, when it’s just bitterly cold and there’s no snow to play in but instead just mud and slush and ice.

But there really are a lot of fun free and cheap winter activities for kids. Here I mention 61 of our favorite cheap and free winter activities for kids and families. 

 

Free and Cheap Winter Activities for Kids That You Can Do at Home

Build a snowman.

Make snow angels.

Make ice cream (use snow, milk, sugar, and any added flavorings of your choice).

Paint the snow (add a few drops of food coloring to water in a spray bottle—so fun for the kiddos!).

Make hot cocoa and make and decorate homemade donuts.

Make and decorate cookies.

Make banana splits or hot fudge sundaes.

Make caramel popcorn.

Make and decorate gingerbread men or gingerbread houses.

Play dolls or superheroes.

Play pirates or ships.

Build a race track and have a race.

Sing Christmas carols.

Sing other favorite songs.

Read together.

Read the Christmas story (the story of Christ’s birth), The Night before Christmas, or other favorite Christmas classics.

Watch a favorite Christmas movie.

Make or put up Christmas decorations.

Decorate the Christmas tree.

Help the kids plan and host a simple Christmas party for their friends.

Write and act out a simple play.

Color or marker together.

Play house (or family, as my five-year-old daughter likes to call it) or school or bakery (or ice cream shop—you get the idea J).

Go on a scavenger hunt.

Draw a map and go on a treasure hunt.

Paint together.

Do finger painting.

Have your children invite a handful of friends over to play simple games like “Duck, Duck, Goose,” “Musical Chairs,” “Hot Potato,” “London Bridges,” “Follow the Leader,” and so on.

Have a tea party.

Play dress-up.

Form a band (create or gather together simple musical instruments to play together as a family or with friends).

Dance together.

Do aerobics or other exercises together.

Do simple (sometimes edible) crafts together.

Give the kids a bubble bath.

Play age-appropriate board games and card games together.

Play with wooden blocks.

Play with marble tube games.

Play with plastic building blocks.

Do puzzles together.

Do chalk art.

Blow bubbles.

Build a fort out of chairs or sectional furniture and large sheets or blankets.

Let the kids help to make a simple meal.

Go “camping” in your family room for the night.

Watch a movie together (let your kids pick it).

Ask your children what they want to do, and then do it.

Free and Cheap Winter Activities for Kids on the Go

Go sledding or tubing.

Visit cousins or set up a play date with friends.

Go to a live Nativity or to an exhibit of Nativities.

Go to a free or inexpensive music or Christmas concert.

Drive around to see Christmas lights.

Go to an indoor pool.

Go out for (inexpensive) ice cream.

Go to a kid-friendly restaurant with a play area and buy ice cream or inexpensive food the kids can eat for a snack, and then let them play for an hour (or three).

Go to an inexpensive movie (dollar theater).

Bundle up and go for a walk (or short hike if you can do so safely).

Make simple snowshoes and go for a walk on the snow.

Visit free or inexpensive museums or aquariums (or go on a day when admission is free or reduced).

Go to activities or to read at the library.

Go to an inexpensive, indoor fun center or trampoline park.

 

Conclusion

Even though it’s cold outside, there are still a ton of free and cheap winter activities you can do to have fun with your kids and help keep them entertained (without sitting in front of the TV or other electronic device all evening long).

 

Let me know in the comments below the fun winter activities for kids that you and your family do during the colder months! I’d love to hear your ideas!

Invitation to Share

Was there something in this article that inspired you to change something about your money? Are there ideas or tips that you feel could help others? Would you please take a minute to share this article via email or social media? I would love your help to share these principles of financial well-being. Thank you!

Join Our Facebook Group!

Join our new, closed Families for Financial Freedom Facebook group to get support and share ideas for how we can all improve our financial well-being by earning more, spending less, saving more, and investing more and reach our financial goals. You can do this! And we are here to help.